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Avoiding State Law Pitfalls (Part 2 of 4)

May 8, 2017

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This is the second hypothetical in our series showing how well-intentioned employers can violate unfamiliar state laws.

Scenario #2

A manager of a Chicago, Illinois restaurant calls you regarding a long-term employee whose son is in the U.S. Marines. The employee would like to take a month off work to spend time with his son before he departs for Iraq. The employee does not have any unused vacation or other form of leave available under the Company’s policies. The manager advises that the employee’s performance is average, but a 30-day leave would negatively impact the restaurant’s operations during the busy summer months. You advise the manager that the Family & Medical Leave Act does not apply because neither the employee nor his family member suffers from a serious health condition, and the Uniformed Services Employment & Reemployment Act (USERRA) is inapplicable because that statute only protects employees who are, themselves,

Early Dismissal Strategies When Dealing With a Dishonest Plaintiff

April 19, 2017

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Dishonest plaintiffs can make it difficult, and in some cases impossible, to successfully move for summary judgment. Indeed, a dishonest plaintiff who understands the legal landscape can easily defeat summary judgment by claiming that there exists “direct evidence” of discrimination in the form of an admission by management that the challenged employment action was motivated by discriminatory animus (e.g., “my supervisor told me he was firing me because of my age”).

While there sometimes is nothing that can be done about a dishonest plaintiff other than attack his/her credibility in front of a jury, it is critical to ensure that that all early dismissal strategies are explored before reaching the dispositive motion stage of case. These early dismissal strategies include examination of plaintiffs’ representations in their post-employment bankruptcy petitions and in forma pauperis (“IFP”) applications.

Those new to employment litigation may be surprised by the percentage of plaintiffs that file

Avoiding State Law Pitfalls (Part 1 of 4)

April 19, 2017

Categories

This is the first hypothetical in our series showing how well-intentioned employers can violate unfamiliar state laws.

Navigating the treacherous waters of federal employment law is not easy. Well-intentioned employers can unknowingly violate some of the more complicated (albeit well-known) laws like the Family & Medical Leave Act and the Americans With Disabilities Act due to a lack of familiarity with the applicable regulations or the case law interpreting them. When an employer has operations in multiple jurisdictions, the analysis becomes even more complex due to circuit splits on pivotal issues.

With so much to worry about on the federal front, it is no wonder that human resources personnel, in-house counsel, and outside counsel often do not spend sufficient time and resources staying apprised of some of the more obscure state laws on the books. If you are reading this article, you almost certainly have internal or external clients relying on

Reducing Exposure to Attorneys’ Fees Awards Through Use of Rule 68 Offers of Judgment (Part 1 of 2)

April 12, 2017

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Sooner or later, a defense attorney will find himself or herself defending an employment lawsuit involving a clear statutory violation or a very bad fact pattern that almost surely will result in a jury verdict in favor of the plaintiff-employee. In these situations, the obvious strategy is to resolve the lawsuit through a settlement. This is because the value of the claim and the defendant-employer’s corresponding exposure continue to increase throughout the course of litigation in the form of back pay accrual and both parties’ attorneys’ fees, since the vast majority of federal and state employment laws contain an attorney fee-shifting provision requiring the defendant to pay a successful plaintiff’s attorneys’ fees (in addition, of course, to the defendant-employer’s contractual obligation to pay its own attorneys’ fees). And although a prevailing plaintiff is entitled to his/her costs and attorneys’ fees under these statutes, a successful defendant is entitled only to

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