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When HAL Conducts the Interview: Illinois Employers Face New Law Regarding Use of A.I. in Employment Interviews

October 29, 2019

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Technology has always had a significant impact on the way companies do business. With the increasing use of artificial intelligence (“A.I.”), no task is exempt from a robotic upgrade. In fact, a growing number of companies are utilizing A.I. to screen potential employees through, among other processes, the video interview. As the New Year approaches, it is important that Illinois employers familiarize themselves with changes in the law surrounding A.I. in hiring. Specifically, beginning January 1, 2020, employers using A.I. to screen applicant video interviews for Illinois-based employment will be subject to the Artificial Intelligence Video Interview Act (the “Act”).

But What Is A.I. Video Interview Screening?

 Most A.I. screening of video interviews involves applicants recording themselves answering a series of interview questions. Like HAL, the conflicted computer in 2001: A Space Odyssey, more sophisticated A.I. even has the ability to simulate “natural” human conversation with which interviewees interact. The video interview is then analyzed using “deep learning,” which is essentially an algorithm that evaluates several data points such as facial expressions, word choice, body language, vocal tone, etc. By the end of the analysis, the A.I. generates an applicant score based on the collected data points and, in some instances, provides a recommendation on whether the applicant is a good fit for the position sought.

So How Does The Act Regulate A.I. Video Interview Screening?

Here is what we know about the Act signed into law by Governor J.B. Pritzker (D) on August 8, 2019:

Requirements:

  • Employers must

Preparation and Training Critical as Illinois Employers Face New Legal Landscape

Illinois employers must begin preparing now for the host of new legal requirements impacting the workplace beginning in 2020.  With legal changes on topics ranging from hiring practices and pay equity to drug testing and severance agreements, employers should not only review and revise their policies, practices and expectations, but also ensure that their Human Resources and management personnel receive training to ensure compliance.

Amendments to the Illinois Human Rights Act (“IHRA”)

Under new amendments to the IHRA, more employers are now subject to the IHRA, more protections are now provided to employees (and others), sexual harassment training is now a requirement, and employers now have reporting obligations to the Illinois Department of Human Rights (“IDHR”) regarding adverse judgments, administrative rulings, and settlements.  Specifically:

  • Beginning July 1, 2020, rather than applying only to employers with 15 or more employees, the IHRA applies to all employers with one or more employees in Illinois during 20 or more calendar weeks. Newly covered employers should ensure that HR personnel and managers are aware of the areas in which the IHRA is broader than federal anti-discrimination laws, including but not limited to: (1) pregnancy accommodation requirements; (2) prohibition of discrimination based on sexual orientation, gender identity, military status, marital status, and order-of-protection status; and (3) the potential for individual liability of harassers.
  • Beginning January 1, 2020, the scope of protection provided by the IHRA will expand. HR personnel and managers must be aware of the new protections so that they appropriately recognize and respond to concerns. 

Impending Changes to the Illinois Human Rights Act: What Every Employer Needs to Know

Responding in part to the #MeToo movement, state and local governments have begun expanding protections for those alleging discrimination and harassment in the workplace.  Last month, the Illinois General Assembly passed a series of amendments to the Illinois Human Rights Act (“the IHRA”) that may have a significant impact on employers if they are signed into law by Governor Bruce Rauner.

  • House Bill 4572: Currently, the IHRA applies to employers who employ 15 or more employees within Illinois for at least 20 weeks per year.  HB 4572 would essentially cover all Illinois employers—any employer who employs one or more employee for at least 20 weeks per year.
  • Senate Bill 20: SB 20 makes several changes to the procedures of the Illinois Department of Human Rights (“IDHR”) and the Human Rights Commission (“the Commission”). Among other things, SB 20 would:
    • Extend the charge-filing period from 180 days after an incident giving rise to a claim to 300 days after the incident;
    • Require the IDHR to notify all parties that the complainant may “opt out” of participating in the IDHR process within 60 days and commence a lawsuit in state court;
    • Change the make-up of the Commission from 13 part-time Commissioners to 7 full-time Commissioners, all of whom must either be licensed to practice law in Illinois or have relevant professional experience;
    • Create a temporary panel of 3 Commissioners to handle the backlog of requests for review; and
    • Require the publication of Commission decisions within 180 days.
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