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Mental health issues at work – #TimetoTalk Day

February 6, 2020

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Today is Time to Talk Day focusing on ending the stigma of mental ill-health in the workplace.

Mental ill-health costs UK employers up to £42 billion annually due to poor productivity, sickness absence and staff turnover. With the number of stress and anxiety workplace-related cases increasing by over 37% just last year, this is a key topic for employers.

Over the last several years there has been a growing recognition of the need for employers to proactively foster mental wellbeing in the workplace and of the benefits this can bring. This is a noticeable shift from the historic approach, which tended to focus more on dealing with the problems only after staff had gone off sick.

#TimetoTalk encourages staff to have conversations about mental health so that they can be more open about the issue and can ask for support if they need it. This reflects key aspects of good practice that employers can adopt to foster good mental health and wellbeing, including:

developing mental health awareness amongst staff by making information, tools and support accessible; destigmatising mental ill-health, for example via networks and support groups, and training up staff to spot the early signs of a mental

UK HR Two Minute Monthly: religious discrimination; TUPE; IR35

Summary

Our first update of 2020 outlines key UK employment law developments over the last month. It includes cases on the definition of ‘employee’ under TUPE, the impact of a job evaluation survey in relation to equal pay, direct maternity discrimination, dress codes and religious discrimination, loss of privilege, and a recent tax tribunal decision on the application of IR35. We also outline other points of note, including the publication of the ICO’s new draft guidance on Subject Access Requests.

Dismissal violated employee’s freedom of expression under Article 10 ECHR

The European Court of Human Rights has held that that an employee’s right to freedom of expression under Article 10 ECHR was violated after he was dismissed for posting on a personal knowledge-sharing website.

The employee described himself in his website blogs as an expert in HR management who worked at a large bank, but did not mention his employer by name.

The employee argued that the termination of his employment breached his right to freedom of expression and appealed to the ECHR. The Court addressed four main questions when considering whether the right to freedom of expression had been infringed:

  1. Nature of the speech – the Government argued

UK HR Two Minute Monthly: covert surveillance; holiday carry over; sexual orientation discrimination; interim relief

Summary

Our December 2019 update outlines the key UK employment law developments over the last month. It includes cases on covert surveillance, sexual orientation discrimination when there is no identifiable victim, harassment under the Protection from Harassment Act 1997, the doctrine of state immunity as it applies to British civilians working in the UK for a foreign state, the test for interim relief in whistleblowing claims and the latest ECJ decision on holiday carry over in sickness absence cases. We also outline other points of note, including the Government’s response to the Women and Equalities Committee report into the use of NDAs in discrimination cases and an independent review of the international evidence on the impact of minimum wages.

Covert CCTV surveillance to monitor workplace theft was not an infringement of employees’ right to privacy under Article 8 ECHR

The European Court of Human Rights has held that the Spanish courts did not fail to protect the Article 8 ECHR rights of employees when they upheld their dismissals based on footage obtained from concealed cameras in the workplace.

The employees worked as supermarket cashiers. An investigation was launched after significant stock discrepancies were identified, which included installing both visible and

UK HR Two Minute Monthly: religious discrimination; third-party harassment; investigations

Summary

Our November update considers recent developments in employment law, including cases on religion and belief discrimination, third party harassment and investigations. We also outline other points of note, including the new EU Whistleblowing Directive and the EHRC’s Guidance on NDAs.

Dismissal not unfair where in-house counsel recommended changes to investigation report

The EAT has held that a dismissal was not unfair where a draft investigation report prepared by HR and an investigator was altered on the recommendation of in-house counsel.

In this case, the in-house solicitor had advised the investigator to remove his evaluative opinions and conclusions of whether the employee’s conduct amounted to misconduct, and to limit the findings to whether there was a prima facie case to answer. This was on the basis that the conclusions should be left to the disciplinary panel that was subsequently appointed.

The EAT upheld the Tribunal’s decision that the overall dismissal was still fair as there was no evidential material that had been withheld from the investigation report for review by the disciplinary panel.  As part of this decision, the EAT took into account that the appeal hearer (who was a barrister) reviewed the draft investigation reports and did not find

THE ACCIDENTAL SUCCESSOR: Asset Buyers Must Take Care to Avoid Unintentionally Becoming a “Perfectly Clear Successor”

October 31, 2019

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Asset Buyers, beware.  If the Seller has union-represented employees, and you intend to hire some or all of those employees and operate the assets as a union-free employer, take care to avoid becoming an accidental successor.

As a recent decision of the D.C. Circuit Court of Appeals reminds us, the terms of the asset purchase agreement (APA) and all communications with Seller’s employees – by both Buyer and Seller – must be carefully managed.  Otherwise, Buyer can accidentally become a “perfectly clear successor” that is required to:

  • initially honor the terms of the existing collective bargaining agreement (CBA),
  • recognize the current labor union as the bargaining representative of the unionized Seller employees whom Buyer hires, and
  • bargain with the union over the terms of a new CBA for those employees going forward.

THE ASSET BUYER’S OPTIONS

Under the National Labor Relations Act, if an asset Seller has union-represented employees, and Buyer wishes to hire some or all of them and operate the assets, Buyer has three basic options:

  • Assume the CBA. Buyer will be bound by the terms of the CBA from the Closing Date and will be obligated to recognize the union as the bargaining representative

New Overtime Rule More Employer-Friendly Than Last Attempt

Today, the U.S. Department of Labor finally announced its long-awaited changes to the regulations regarding overtime compensation. Effective January 1, 2020, the minimum salary required for most exemptions under the Fair Labor Standards Act will rise from $455 per week to $684 per week (or from $23,660 to $35,568 annualized). The minimum salary for the “highly compensated employee” exemption will rise from $100,000 to $107,432 per year.

Additionally, employers will be permitted to use nondiscretionary bonuses and other incentive payments (including commissions) to satisfy up to ten percent (10%) of the required minimum salary, as long as that compensation is paid at least annually. And if an employee fails to earn sufficient incentive compensation in a 52-week period to maintain “exempt” status, the employer may make up the shortfall (up to 10% of the minimum required salary) in a one-time payment in the first pay period after the end of the 52-week period.

The “final rule” announced today is more employer-friendly than the Department’s last attempt to update the overtime regulations, which was enjoined by a federal court in 2016 before the changes could take effect. The final rule issued in 2016 would have raised the minimum salaries for exemption

U.S. Department of Labor Proposes Changes to Minimum Salary for Overtime Exemptions

On March 7, 2019, the United States Department of Labor issued a notice of proposed rulemaking that would change the minimum salary levels necessary for an employee to be properly classified as exempt from the overtime compensation requirements of the Fair Labor Standards Act.  Under the proposed rule, the minimum salary for most exemptions would rise from $455 per week ($23,660 annualized) to $679 per week ($35,308 annualized).  The minimum annual compensation for the “highly compensated employee” exemption would rise from $100,000 to $147,414.

For employees in the executive, administrative and professional exemptions, the proposed rule would permit nondiscretionary bonuses and incentive payments (including commissions) to satisfy up to ten percent (10%) of the required minimum salary.  In addition, provided that the employee has received at least ninety percent (90%) of the required minimum compensation in each payroll week for 52 weeks, the employer would be permitted to make a single “catch-up” payment within one pay period after the end of the 52-week period, in order to bring the employee’s compensation to the required level.

For “highly compensated employees,” the proposed rule would require that ten percent (10%) of the minimum annual compensation be paid in the form of a

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