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Coronavirus: UK Job Support Scheme – key details for employers

As we reported previously, on 12 May 2020 the Chancellor of the Exchequer announced that the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme (“CJRS”) would be extended until 31 October 2020.  With just over 5 weeks until the CJRS ends, the Chancellor of the Exchequer has, today, made an announcement setting out the government’s package of measures designed to protect UK jobs through the winter.

Job Support Scheme

With effect from 1 November 2020, the new Job Support Scheme (“JSS”) will come into force.  The key details of the JSS are as follows:

  • It is designed to support the wages of employees who are in viable jobs, but on shorter working hours.
  • Employees must work at least 1/3 of their normal working hours and be paid by their employer for those hours.
  • For the hours not worked, the government and the employer will each pay one third of an employee’s salary.
  • The level of grant will be calculated based on an employee’s usual salary, capped at £697.92 per month.
  • All small and medium enterprises are eligible to participate in the JSS.
  • Larger businesses, whose turnover has fallen as a result of coronavirus, are also eligible to participate in the JSS, subject to complying with certain conditions, including restrictions on capital distributions to their shareholders.
  • The JSS is open to all employers, including those who have not participated in the CJRS.
  • The JSS will remain in force for 6 months from 1 November 2020.
  • Employers will not be permitted to issue notices

UK HR Solutions: Sickness Absence FAQs

Welcome to the next post in our weekly series of hands-on guidance for UK HR professionals. In this series we look at common HR issues that you’ll encounter in the workplace and give you practical guidance on how to deal with them. Over the course of the series we’re covering a variety of topics, such as how to handle grievances, disciplinaries, suspension, performance management and much more besides.

This week we continue our look at managing sickness absence with a set of FAQs that UK employers commonly ask.

Click here to read our sickness absence FAQs.

This article was co-written with Trainee Solicitor Peter Summerfield.

Coronavirus: new UK restrictions – implications for employers

Amidst rising numbers of infections, the UK government has, today, made an announcement in relation to new Coronavirus restrictions.

Key highlights of the new restrictions

  • employees who can work from home should do so;
  • restaurants, bars and pubs must operate a table service only and must close at 10pm each day from 24 September 2020;
  • retail and hospitality staff will be required to wear face coverings;
  • retail, leisure and hospitality businesses are now legally required to ensure that their premises are COVID secure;
  • conferences and sporting events will not re-open from the beginning of October, as previously planned; and
  • tighter penalties will be applied, including fines of up to £10,000 for businesses which break COVID rules.

The above restrictions are anticipated to continue in place for the next 6 months.

Implications for employers

  • Plans to bring employees back to the office will need to be reconsidered in light of this announcement.
  • Employers operating in the leisure and hospitality sector will need to be mindful of the need to make changes to working hours and shift patterns.
  • These restrictions, combined with the cessation of the furlough scheme at the end of October 2020, may mean that employers will need to consider whether redundancies are necessary.

BCLP has assembled a COVID-19 Employment & Labor taskforce to assist clients with employment law issues across various jurisdictions. You can contact the taskforce at: COVID-19HRLabour&EmploymentIssues@bclplaw.com. You can also view other thought leadership, guidance, and helpful information on our dedicated COVID-19

UK HR Solutions: How to deal with sickness absence

Welcome to the next post in our weekly series of hands-on guidance for UK HR professionals. In this series we look at common HR issues that you’ll encounter in the workplace and give you practical guidance on how to deal with them. Over the course of the series we’re covering a variety of topics, such as how to handle grievances, disciplinaries, suspension, performance management and much more besides.

This week we look at how to deal with sickness absence.

Click here to read our sickness absence guidance note.

UK HR Solutions: Performance Management FAQs

Welcome to the next post in our weekly series of hands-on guidance for UK HR professionals. In this series we look at common HR issues that you’ll encounter in the workplace and give you practical guidance on how to deal with them. Over the course of the series we’re covering a variety of topics, such as how to handle grievances, disciplinaries, suspension, sickness absence and much more besides.

This week we continue our look at performance management with a set of FAQs that UK employers commonly ask.

Click here to read our Performance Management FAQs.

UK HR Solutions: Managing performance issues

Welcome to the next post in our weekly series of hands-on guidance for UK HR professionals. In this series we look at common HR issues that you’ll encounter in the workplace and give you practical guidance on how to deal with them. Over the course of the series we’re covering a variety of topics, such as how to handle grievances, disciplinaries, suspension, sickness absence and much more besides.

This week we look at managing performance issues.

Click here to read our guidance note on what to do when a performance issue arises.

This article was co-written with Paralegal Peter Summerfield.

UK HR Solutions: Managing disciplinary issues

Welcome to the second post in our new weekly series of hands-on guidance for UK HR professionals. In this series we look at common HR issues that you’ll encounter in the workplace and give you practical guidance on how to deal with them. Over the course of the series we’re covering a variety of topics, such as how to handle grievances, suspensions, poor performance, sickness absence and much more besides.

This week we look at disciplinaries.

Click here to read our step by step guide on what to do when a disciplinary issue arises.

UK HR Solutions: Grievances and how to handle them

Welcome to the first in our new weekly series of hands-on guidance for UK HR professionals. In this series we look at common HR issues that you’ll encounter in the workplace and give you practical guidance on how to deal with them. In the forthcoming weeks we will cover a variety of topics, such as how to manage disciplinaries, suspensions, poor performance, sickness absence and much more besides.

In our first edition, we are looking at grievances. The way in which an employer handles a grievance has long term employee relations implications, in addition to potential legal liabilities.

Click here to read our step by step guide to grievances and how to handle them.

UK HR Two Minute Monthly: disability discrimination; TUPE; employment status

August 11, 2020

Categories

As we move towards a ‘new normal’, our August 2020 update outlines some of the key non-COVID related employment law developments in the UK over the last month. It includes a TUPE-related ECJ judgment which takes a different approach to our usual domestic position, as well as cases on disability discrimination and agency workers. We also provide an update of other recent points of interest. You can find our latest UK COVID-19 employment law updates for the UK here.

Unfair dismissal of long-term sick employee does not automatically mean dismissal is disability discrimination

The Employment Appeal Tribunal (‘EAT’) has held that an employment tribunal erred in focusing on an employer’s decision-making process when considering whether a dismissal arising from disability was proportionate.

The employee was dismissed for disability-related sickness absence. The employment tribunal found that she had been unfairly dismissed. It also upheld the employee’s claim that her dismissal constituted discrimination arising from disability, rejecting the employer’s objective justification defence to the disability discrimination claim. It held that the employer’s aims of protecting scarce public resources and reducing the impact of the employee’s absence on her colleagues were legitimate but that it was not justified because it was not a proportionate means of achieving either aim.

The EAT upheld the employer’s appeal against the finding of discrimination. Having accepted that the employer had legitimate aims for the dismissal, a balancing exercise between the employer’s needs and the discriminatory effect of the dismissal should have been carried out. The fact

US COVID-19: FFCRA Implications of School Reopening Plans

With school reopening plans currently a hot topic across the country, a natural corollary is:  What do those plans mean for employee requests for leave to care for a child under the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”)?  Under the FFCRA regulations and previous guidance issued by the Department of Labor (“DOL”), the answer appears to be that if a child’s school is physically open and the child is permitted by the school to attend in person, then any personal choice by the child’s parents to instead have the child participate in remote schooling will not provide a qualifying reason for FFCRA leave.

The FFCRA entitles eligible employees of covered employers to take up to two weeks of Paid Sick Leave, and up to ten additional weeks of Expanded FMLA leave, when the employee is unable to work (including telework) due to a bona fide need for leave to care for a child whose school or child care provider is closed or unavailable for reasons related to COVID-19 (“Child Care Leave”).  See https://www.dol.gov/agencies/whd/pandemic/ffcra-employee-paid-leave; 29 CFR §§ 826.20(a)(v), (b).

Early on during the pandemic, the DOL made clear through its Q&A guidance that Child Care Leave is available when instruction has moved entirely online, due to the physical location of a school being closed:

  • My child’s school or place of care has moved to online instruction or to another model in which children are expected or required to complete assignments at home. Is it “closed”?
  •  

    Yes. If

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