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New York City Follows Trend in Predictable Scheduling Law

New York City Follows Trend in Predictable Scheduling Law

June 27, 2017

Authored by: Bryan Cave At Work

Bryan Cave’s Retail practice recently published a Client Alert: New York City Follows Trend in Predictable Scheduling Law.  The Alert highlights New York City’s new scheduling law for retail employers and discusses the impact of similar laws in other major cities. Follow the link below to read more.

https://www.bryancave.com/en/thought-leadership/new-york-city-follows-trend-in-predictable-scheduling-law.html

 

Minimum Wage Increases on the Horizon in California

Effective July 1, 2017, employers in San Francisco must raise the minimum wage from $13.00/hour to $14.00/hour.  By July 1, 2018, San Francisco’s minimum wage rate will be $15.00/hour.  Similarly, in the city of Los Angeles and the unincorporated areas of Los Angeles County, for employers with more than 25 employees, the minimum wage will be increased from $10.50/hour to $12.00/hour.  These minimum wage rates are currently higher than the State of California’s minimum wage rate of $10.50/hour for employers with more than 25 employees.  California will gradually increase minimum wage rates for employers with more than 25 employees, adding $1 to the base rate every January 1st culminating in $15.00/hour by January 1, 2022.

Bryan Cave LLP has a team of knowledgeable lawyers and other professionals prepared to help employers assess their minimum wage obligations. If you or your organization would like more information on wages or any other employment

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